His name was Lapu-Lapu.


The results of Magellan's arrival in the Philippines is evident in the amount of European loanwords and last names that still exist there, not to mention the hold Christianity, and more notably Catholicism, still has. But without denigrating the work that went into preparation of the voyage, and into the voyage itself prior to his arrival, the members of his crew - those who didn't die or mutiny, anyway - deserve the credit for circumnavigation, not Magellan himself.

Field trips to the shrine in elementary school were a different experience to more recent visits. As you can see, there was far less greenery around, and the sea was a lot easier to see then. The visitor's center is a comparatively newer addition, and the structure around the shrine itself has gotten an update. One thing that hasn't changed, though - while there's a mural in the shrine of Magellan and his crew landing among the locals, the statue dominating the area isn't his. It's that of Lapu-Lapu, who refused to accept what a more technologically advanced invader would have forced upon him.

And if I celebrate anything in relation to Magellan, I'm celebrating in April.

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