How many times have I said I prefer cats?

I'm likely not the first to mention the use of mythology, scripture, or literary references as the same sort of mental shorthand that memes are used for in contemporary culture - I think I've referred to this particular episode at least twice now.


That said, the dog whistle issue of race is the last defense of those in a weakened political party with self-defeating slogans reflecting failed policies. (Those who blew it are likely aware that the whistle now has less clout.) At least one article seems to wax nostalgic about way back when political agendas got pushed through magazine covers, music, games, even horoscopes (same pattern, different leash) and memes, with stupendous effect. (Huh. Not so way back when, going by some of these publication dates.)


Despite everything that's happened since, the internet has a longer memory than one year. Even then, one has only to look at recent news to see who's more capable of using culture to leverage their side of the divide. (I'm as unfamiliar with AOT as I am with Thanos, and those getting back to work might want to reconsider how much protection the court of public opinion has been cultivated to provide.) This gaslighting of people into thinking the balance of culture war has shifted is a pestilential notion (who do I thank for those updates?) that I'd very much like to see discarded. (Adding the question of whether "back to work" entails politics, sales, or bartending.)


I won't forget what I found exciting, encouraging, even inspirational, in these works of fiction, and will continue to use these works of fiction for my own needs; however, neither will I forget the people responsible for that entertainment, how they used it for their agendas, and what the results of that use have been.


- Keeping an eye on this because 十年不晚.


- Ending with this because despite the efforts of those who still think they're the good guys, there exist those who choose to hope.

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